How should one read a book?

(4 Einträge)

Lecture How should one read a book?, 1. and 2. Lesson

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Title: Lecture How should one read a book?, 1. and 2. Lesson
Description: Vorlesung im SoSe 2019; Dienstag, 16. April 2019
Creator: Matthias Bauer (author)
Contributor: ZDV Universität Tübingen (producer)
Publisher: ZDV Universität Tübingen
Date Created: 2019-04-16
Subjects: English Literature, Reading, Book, Lecture, Vorlesung, Spring, Ali Smith, How Should One Read a Book, Virginia Woolf, Competency, Comprehension, Understanding, Construction,
Identifier: UT_20190416_001_book_0001
Rights: Rechtshinweise
Abstracts: It is the purpose of this lecture series to suggest ways in which we may establish for ourselves a meaningful network of English literary texts: beginners in the field will get ideas where to start and how to progress, those approaching final exams will get ideas how to build up a reading list, and those outside and beyond those final exams will get ideas about what to explore next. The idea is to do literary history differently: not to work our ways through centuries, isms, schools, and trends, but to establish a network of literary texts of all kinds and ages, from Chaucer to the present day. We will connect them by specific aspects of reading. After an introductory session on "Why Read (English) Literature? How to Read Literature" (week 1) we will focus on Reading for...Plot (week 2),...Character (3),...Time and Space (4), ...Form (5),...Language (6),...the Relation to the Actual World (7),...Common Concerns (8),...Ideas (9),...Literary Communication (10),...Effect (11). In our concluding session (12), we will be reviewing the links.

Lecture How should one read a book?, 3. and 4. Lesson

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Title: Lecture How should one read a book?, 3. and 4. Lesson
Description: Vorlesung im SoSe 2019; Dienstag, 23. April 2019
Creator: Matthias Bauer (author)
Contributor: ZDV Universität Tübingen (producer)
Publisher: ZDV Universität Tübingen
Date Created: 2019-04-23
Subjects: English Literature, Reading, Book, Lecture, Vorlesung, Plot, Story, Discourse, Robert Browning, My Last Duchess, Wilkie Collins,
Identifier: UT_20190423_001_book_0001
Rights: Rechtshinweise
Abstracts: It is the purpose of this lecture series to suggest ways in which we may establish for ourselves a meaningful network of English literary texts: beginners in the field will get ideas where to start and how to progress, those approaching final exams will get ideas how to build up a reading list, and those outside and beyond those final exams will get ideas about what to explore next. The idea is to do literary history differently: not to work our ways through centuries, isms, schools, and trends, but to establish a network of literary texts of all kinds and ages, from Chaucer to the present day. We will connect them by specific aspects of reading. After an introductory session on "Why Read (English) Literature? How to Read Literature" (week 1) we will focus on Reading for...Plot (week 2),...Character (3),...Time and Space (4), ...Form (5),...Language (6),...the Relation to the Actual World (7),...Common Concerns (8),...Ideas (9),...Literary Communication (10),...Effect (11). In our concluding session (12), we will be reviewing the links.

Lecture How should one read a book?, 5. and 6. Lesson

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Title: Lecture How should one read a book?, 5. and 6. Lesson
Description: Vorlesung im SoSe 2019; Dienstag, 30. April 2019
Creator: Matthias Bauer (author)
Contributor: ZDV Universität Tübingen (producer)
Publisher: ZDV Universität Tübingen
Date Created: 2019-04-30
Subjects: English Literature, Reading, Book, Lecture, Vorlesung, Character, Aristotle, Typologies of Character, Individuals, Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, Telling Tales,
Identifier: UT_20190430_001_book_0001
Rights: Rechtshinweise
Abstracts: It is the purpose of this lecture series to suggest ways in which we may establish for ourselves a meaningful network of English literary texts: beginners in the field will get ideas where to start and how to progress, those approaching final exams will get ideas how to build up a reading list, and those outside and beyond those final exams will get ideas about what to explore next. The idea is to do literary history differently: not to work our ways through centuries, isms, schools, and trends, but to establish a network of literary texts of all kinds and ages, from Chaucer to the present day. We will connect them by specific aspects of reading. After an introductory session on "Why Read (English) Literature? How to Read Literature" (week 1) we will focus on Reading for...Plot (week 2),...Character (3),...Time and Space (4), ...Form (5),...Language (6),...the Relation to the Actual World (7),...Common Concerns (8),...Ideas (9),...Literary Communication (10),...Effect (11). In our concluding session (12), we will be reviewing the links.

Lecture How should one read a book?, 7. and 8. Lesson

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Title: Lecture How should one read a book?, 7. and 8. Lesson
Description: Vorlesung im SoSe 2019; Dienstag, 07. Mai 2019
Creator: Matthias Bauer (author)
Contributor: ZDV Universität Tübingen (producer)
Publisher: ZDV Universität Tübingen
Date Created: 2019-05-07
Subjects: English Literature, Reading, Book, Lecture, Vorlesung, Time, Space, Chronotope, The Tempest, William Shakespeare, Robinson Crusoe,
Identifier: UT_20190507_001_book_0001
Rights: Rechtshinweise
Abstracts: It is the purpose of this lecture series to suggest ways in which we may establish for ourselves a meaningful network of English literary texts: beginners in the field will get ideas where to start and how to progress, those approaching final exams will get ideas how to build up a reading list, and those outside and beyond those final exams will get ideas about what to explore next. The idea is to do literary history differently: not to work our ways through centuries, isms, schools, and trends, but to establish a network of literary texts of all kinds and ages, from Chaucer to the present day. We will connect them by specific aspects of reading. After an introductory session on "Why Read (English) Literature? How to Read Literature" (week 1) we will focus on Reading for...Plot (week 2),...Character (3),...Time and Space (4), ...Form (5),...Language (6),...the Relation to the Actual World (7),...Common Concerns (8),...Ideas (9),...Literary Communication (10),...Effect (11). In our concluding session (12), we will be reviewing the links.